Doggy signs

Being up here in the mountain most of the time, I have not seen that many dogs during my time in Japan. In the urban areas, several different kinds dogs can be found, but definitely not like back home.

 

The dog is prohibited, since poop is left outside the warning sign

More of the same kind:

Does he look like he cares where he “goes”? He’s saying “fun!”

 

 

Dogs run. Nuff said.

 

Some of the signs I have encountered so far are rather self-explanatory, while others require Japanese skills.

This puppy is fast

 

Even businesses have adapted the cute style in their logos.

This puppy needs treatment

 

I wonder why he looks so sad and his friends are maniacs

 

I have seen maybe 4 live dogs in total (besides those poor puppies in the pet store under the railways)! Proof of that:

 

He’s coming to get me!
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Secret paradises

Some more traditional Japan!

Fields like in the middle of Europe

Rough bare stone terrain, traditional bamboo forest, pine tree forest, fields and various different vegetation was passed during a hike to the secret onsen. After hiking in the sun for almost an hour, the reward was tremendous.

 

Steaming hot mineral water

 

Beppu is known for its’ hot springs, onsen. There are several onsens around the city, most of which are spa-like and run by entrepreneurs. My first onsen experience here was different – these onsens were in the mountains, completely in the natural state, and free of charge.

We decided to pretend we don’t understand the several warning signs

A girl was killed in the onsen where we went a year ago, thus there was several sign warning about going to the onsens a)alone, b)with only women and c)during night time. In addition to that, there was another sign regarding proper code of conduct.

 

Beware of suspicious man and car!

 

After the first two onsens (one pictured above, plus a mud onsen next to it) we continued to a third one even higher up the mountain. The last onsen we went to was apparently rather popular among Japanese men, so as to respect their privacy (and private parts), I don’t have many pictures.

Steaming hot water, next to streaming cold water

The onsens would be perfect during night time, to watch the stars. Also in the winter I can imagine that sitting in the hot bath would be spectacular – getting out would not be so pleasant. The road to the onsens was very poor, so in the winter time it might be tricky to drive there by car. Walking in the dark would definitely not be an option, either. We had a chance to boil some eggs in a hole that had boiling water – next time we were thinking about having a picnic with more food to boil and steam. What a better way to spend a day, than hiking, and then chilling in the hot bath and eating food prepared in the nature.

 

Nature at its’ best

Signs of Japan, pt. 1

Japan is a safe country, with many rules of conduct. There are also written and illustrated rules, which makes life easier. The Japanese polite enough to instruct foreigners and others unable to understand the kanji, hiragana and katakana characters by giving instructions and restrictions also as pictures and in Engrish.

During my stay, I will post about different rules and other signs I find interesting, funny, or otherwise worth posting about.

Sanitation is important – am I supposed to gargle with the disinfectant?
Is this OK?
Happy looking dog(s?) run there

Until next time, sayonara!